banner

4 ways Republicans can dismantle Obamacare


The bill doesn’t abolish Obamacare entirely through reconciliation. It doesn’t, for example, repeal the provision that allows young adults to stay on their parents’ health plans – that doesn’t cost the federal government anything. Congress also couldn’t repeal the ban on annual or lifetime limits for coverage.

Republicans actually don’t bring back pre-existing conditions through this option either – insurance plans would still be required to offer coverage to anyone who wants it.

That being said, this would not be a good situation for people who buy their own insurance. Quite the opposite, experts expect that the individual market would collapse if this repeal bill passed without a replacement plan.

Here’s why: The repeal bill gets rid of the health care law’s key tools to get people to sign up coverage, insurance subsidies to make plans affordable, and the individual mandate to make carrying coverage the law. Without those, premiums would near certainly spike as only the sickest people buy coverage – and health plans would likely flee the market, no longer finding the population an appealing one to cover.

“I think the market self-destructs if you don’t have the premium tax credits or don’t have the mandate,” says Tim Jost, emeritus professor at William and Mary College of Law.

“The private market would collapse, and might no longer exist,” says Nicholas Bagley, an assistant professor of law at the University of Michigan who focuses on health policy.

One other thing to keep in mind about the 2015 reconciliation bill: It’s not the final word on what Republicans could repeal through reconciliation. It is what Republicans came up with in December, when they knew it would be vetoed by President Obama.

But now that it has a decent chance at passing, legislators might try and tack on the repeal of other Obamacare provisions – and try to convince the Senate parliamentarian that these pieces also relate to the federal budget.

“The 2015 bill is a floor, but it doesn’t tell us about other sections they might try to include,” says Gluck. “It’s unpredictable what will be judged to have budgetary implications. In 2015, they didn’t need to be careful. They knew their bill wouldn’t pass. Now, they might want to think more carefully about what to include.”

What's Your Reaction?
WTF! WTF!
0
WTF!
Cute Cute
0
Cute
Buzz Buzz
0
Buzz
LOL LOL
0
LOL
Geeky Geeky
0
Geeky
Win Win
0
Win
Angry Angry
0
Angry
Fail Fail
0
Fail
Love Love
0
Love

log in

reset password

Back to
log in